American Turban

Reflecting on the week that was

A sign held at the vigil in Oak Creek, Wisconsin last week in memory of that community's lost Sikhs (source: Totella)

A sign held at the vigil in Oak Creek, Wisconsin last week in memory of that community’s lost Sikhs (source: Totella)

This time last week was the day-after of the Oak Creek, Wisconsin Gurdwara shooting, and I found myself still processing through what had happened the day before:

It was only yesterday that I was randomly switching channels to watch my one of my favorite cable news shows, but was instead confronted with bold headlines sprawled across the screen: “WISCONSIN,” “SIKH,” “SHOOTING,” “TEMPLE.” It would take me a few moments to absorb. Innocent Sikh men, women and children were being attacked and killed by a now-alleged white supremacist. All indications were pointing in the direction of a hate-based crime. The nightmare of America’s Sikhs – who have long suffered much of the brunt of post-9/11 backlash in discrimination, hate crimes and murder – was a reality unfolding before my eyes.

I found myself today on Totella.com browsing a collage of videos and photos documenting the attack and the response during the week. I am still in some disbelief of the week that was.

The funerals of the six victims took place this past weekend and this brings one sense of closure, but the legacy of their murders still carries on. It is clear that the American Sikh community and its friends have continued the conversation in the wake of the shooting, and this is promising if we hope such an event will never occur again.

And, with news since the attack of hate crimes on mosques, and another mass shooting in Texas, it is clear how important continuing the conversation really is.

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